Abstract

Research Article

SARS-CoV-2 infection and phylogenetic analysis with the risk factors in human body alongside the pulmonary effects and medication

Ahnaf Ilman*, Mauro Luisetto, Ahmed Yesvi Rafa, Naeem Musa, Md. Abu Syed, Sabit Ibtisam Anan and Tazwan Haque

Published: 2020-11-06 00:00:00 | Volume 4 - Issue 1 | Pages: 023-029

Related the extremely transmittable abilities of SARS-CoV-2,a harmonious virus to the bat CoV, gets transmitted by three principal processes-- the inhalation of droplets from the SARS-CoV-2 infected person, contacting to the person, and by the surfaces and materials defiled with the virus. Whereupon bat Coronavirus is mostly like the pandemic causing virus SARS-CoV-2, bats are often deliberated and figured out as a possible primary host although no intermediate has not been defined yet in the wherewithal of transmission. The Spike Glycoprotein plays an important role in the case of penetration with the assistance of the ACE2 receptor and the Receptor Binding Domain. In the human body, infiltrating the nucleic acid into host cells, SARS-CoV-2 attacks one cell and one by one into the whole human body; therefore, infected cases are found symptomatic and asymptomatic considering the immune power. Patients with cardiovascular disease or diabetes proceed with their treatment with ACE2 often; therefore, there might be a high chance of getting infected. Whereas the SARS-CoV-2 infects the blood and then lungs, Antigens improvement can be better in order to avoid high-complicated effects. Currently, no vaccination or no accurate cure and treatment has not been defined. An explanation with analysis on SARS-CoV-2 has been performed from the aspect of virology, immunology and molecular biology. Several relevant figures have been included hereby in order to a better understanding of the very concept.

Read Full Article HTML DOI: 10.29328/journal.ibm.1001018 Cite this Article Read Full Article Pdf

Figures:

Figure 1

Figure 1:

Related the extremely transmittable abilities of SARS-CoV...

Figure 1

Figure 2:

Related the extremely transmittable abilities of SARS-CoV...

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